A STOP IN HUACACHINA

NOMADSofORIGIN Magazine l A Stop in Hucachina

Built around a lagoon, the Peruvian town Huacachina is a South American oasis

Words: Emily Georgieva

Photography: Willian Justen de Vasconcello

19 January 2019

Naturally, the first thing one should do when travelling to Huacachina, Peru is to sand-board. Climbing up the huge sand dunes becomes an unforgettable adventure and it's a great way to experience the place for what it truly is - a challenging, beautiful oasis that will make you feel as if you are on top of the world. Once you make your way to the top of the sand dunes, skiing or sand-boarding all the way down the silky hills will possibly make your heart race. The exhilarating experience is a must when visiting the town and there is even a professional sand-ski team, who can help anyone feel ready to dive into this unusual ride.

Huacachina really is an oasis. During the week it has a very calm and peaceful reputation, however once the weekend rolls in a lot of tourists head towards Casa de Arena to grab a few cocktails and dance the night away. For those, who are planning a trip to this charming town in Peru and want to experience it to the fullest, it becomes very easy to create a balanced plan. Between the sand dunes rides and the wild atmosphere in the nightclubs where dancing becomes a religion, Huacachina is known to tame the hearts of travellers who go there for the view. You can easily spend a day just getting to know the desert and enjoying a swing on a hammock by sundown if you are staying a night at the local hotels. The South American oasis also offers a tour to vineyards for the wine lovers.

One of the coolest things you can see in the area is the Nasca Lines. The incredible geometric patterns are curved into the ground, shaping what looks like different animals in surface stones. The place has become a definite stop on a trip to Peru. The lines change the landscape, transforming it around curious geometrical shapes. A mystery for over 80 years, the Nasca Lines consists of 300 geometrical forms and 800 straight lines, some of which measure to the height of the Empire State Building. Known as geoglyphs, the lines have been described by scientists as "the largest astronomy book in the world" as they are believed to serve a calendar and astronomical purpose. The lines identify as possibly the greatest cultural symbol in the area, believed to have been used by previous inhabitants of the land in relation to traditions and rituals.

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